If you use DomainNameSales you know that even if you don’t use their internal brokerage team, after a lead has sat there for a while it gets forwarded to one of their team members to try to rekindle the lead and see if they can turn it into something. I don’t know if you can opt out of this but after today I’m going to find out. One of their brokers reached out to a lead of mine (very important to note, this is my lead that came in on my domain, this is not a DNS lead for them to use as they please) and the DNS broker talked to the lead on the phone. You can not track what happens on the phone but you can see the followup correspondence through the internal DNS system. The broker writes to my lead and says:

“Looks like we got disconnected — just let me know if you want me to extend an offer to acquire the .com; alternatively, I am happy to look at derivative names that also would fit your needs…”

Apparently this broker at DNS thinks this is his lead and he can offer to show the lead domain names not owned by me. Ummmm, I don’t think buddy.

1. It is not professional in any way, shape or form to do this.
2. It is my lead generated by my domain. If you want to use that lead for any other purpose you better have my approval and be paying me for it. My domains should not be generating commissions for you on domains not owned by me.

I would think this is common sense but it looks like a training course may be needed for at least one member of the DNS internal brokerage team. #NotCool

28 comments on “What Kind of Broker Does This?

  • So you are using their FREE system and are happy to accept all the free leads that come your way… Now when a broker tries to salvage one and make a sale on for you, you are complaining? Really?

    • Hmmm, interesting, explain to me how it is free? By parking my domains with them they receive a cut on the parking revenue. Anything I have using Buy It Now pricing they receive an automatic 10% commission. And anything a broker sells is either 12.5% or 15% (I forget which). So again, how is that “free”?
      And I am fine with them receiving these fees because that is an understood part of using their platform. What I am not fine with is the broker attempting to sell a domain I don’t own to my lead.

    • Because the phone call got disconnected apparently so the broker sent the lead a message through DNS platform. I can see the message which is what I posted.

  • This is not the default. You have somehow opted in.

    It is very bad nevertheless.
    I am sure they will tell you that this buyer was their lead first before they contacted you about your domain. But it doesn’t give them the authority to do this while talking about your domain.
    Bad, bad.

    • Thanks, I looked and did find the feature. I can’t remember if I opted in, or if this is default setting, but I have now disabled it.

  • Chris,

    My name is Jeffrey Gabriel. I am the Vice President of Sales at DomainNameSales.com. I read what you wrote, the comments listed below, and I think there is a misunderstanding here.

    Many of our customers use the self broker aka FREE brokerage service we offer to all of our clients. Some of our customers opt into using our Brokers and yes we do charge for this added service.

    Some of our clients who self broker for free do not always respond to their leads, OR they give it their best then instead of having the lead go the wayside have the leads reassigned to our brokerage.

    This is a service that YOU our client has to opt into. Our customers can choose anywhere between 30 days up to over 120. You must have done this in the past. You can opt out of this service by going to AUTO ASSIGNMENT section then OLD LEAD FOLLOWUP.

    The lead you are speaking about came in on August 22 then was Auto Assigned on September 22nd. You have your account assigned to 30 days to reassign old leads. That means you did not touch the lead at all and never responded for 30 days. The system reassigned it to one of our Brokers.

    We have had an immense amount of success raking up behind our customers who self broker. Only when they want us to. Instead of throwing leads away we will continuously followup until the buyer says please stop, purchase the domain or we find they are not qualified.

    Happy to discuss further with you personally.

    Thank you for your business.

    Jeffrey M. Gabriel
    1-800-818-1828 x6261

    • Jeff – My problem was with the broker offering to look at “derivative names” for the buyer. I don’t own any derivative names of the domain the buyer had made contact on. Though I’d guess there is a big database that the broker can quickly scan through all DNS listed domains and find a derivative one to offer (which would not be from my portfolio), or suggest a new gTLD one.

      • Chris,

        There are many negotiation strategies that our Brokers use in their “Bag of Tricks” and this one happens to be called, The Take Away.

        A buyer has come to the Parked page, and or marketplace, created an inquiry and has provided their name, phone number, email address and in some cases a message. That buyer has made a conscious decision to purchase that specific domain.

        When that buyer makes a poor/unqualified offer or they have become disengaged asking that buyer if they would like to find an alternative actually gets them to reengage and make more serious offers because they know their 100, 200 or 300 dollar offer on a ten thousand dollar domain truly will not work. It can also bring them back to the negotiation in some way. Obviously, there are exceptions to this rule, and there are times to use this and to not.

        In essence, it is merely a question. Some of our clients own tens of thousands of domains, and we could not possibly know if you possess a domain that would fit this buyer. We cannot read over every single domain in your portfolio merely to ask such a question. My suggestion…It looks like you read the threads to see what the Broker is doing…Why not call him? Why not tell me what you like or do not like us to do so we can make note of it for next time? Even if you do not want to give us any of your leads…We will cross paths someday, I am sure of it!

        As for the TLD discussion…I can promise up and down that we would not do that. I would think you would still doubt me. It sounds like you are genuinely concerned about this possibility and heck I do not blame you. The reality is, It is simple math…We MIGHT make 10 or 20 dollars on a new registration or 100, 1000, 10,000 on a commission. Why would we do that?

        I hope I have answered all your questions Chris. I have one for you:

        I took the domain you received the lead on today that started this great article you wrote. I searched it on Sedo. It is on their marketplace for sale as a make offer. If I do make an offer, but do not purchase or I do purchase I guarantee I will be solicited for many other similar domains, auctions etc. All of which most likely are not your domains. Why are you OK with them doing that?

        Thank you.

        Jeffrey M. Gabriel

        • “I took the domain you received the lead on today that started this great article you wrote. I searched it on Sedo. It is on their marketplace for sale as a make offer. If I do make an offer, but do not purchase or I do purchase I guarantee I will be solicited for many other similar domains, auctions etc. All of which most likely are not your domains. Why are you OK with them doing that? ”

          Jeff – I am not aware of Sedo doing this. I’ve made offers on domains at Sedo but I’ve never received any correspondence from Sedo offering me alternative names. But here’s the key difference… any lead I get through Sedo was generated by Sedo. Without Sedo I wouldn’t have had that lead (since I don’t park my domains at Sedo). So while the lead is for my domain, they truly generated that lead by bringing traffic to their site and that traffic found my domain on their site. With domains I have at DNS, my domain (not DNS) is generating that lead so I would consider that my lead since it was my asset that generated it.

          Look, I like DNS, I use it, and I recommend it to people. I’ve written posts that positively mention it. But if I have an issue that is also fair game to be written about. And I usually reserve writing about those issues unless it is something that I’m really bothered by.

          • Chris,

            We appreciate your business, and I am happy you write about these things because this is how we get better. I have learned a lot about where myself, and our team has come up short on blogs.

            I see it not just from the articles people like yourself write, but also in the comments section.

            I always try and put myself in the chair of a customer and look at it from your point of view. The question I asked, and the answer you gave makes perfect sense.

            Thank you for the clarification. Thank you again for the business.

            Jeffrey M. Gabriel

        • Jeffrey why not do what everybody is asking you?
          Don’t offer other people’s domains unless you have permission.
          Suddenly it is an optout instead of an optin.

          So this statement you made earlier is not true:
          “When a buyer is not interested we do reserve the right to offer that buyer other alternatives from your very own portfolio. I do not see how anyone would be against that.”
          Because then you said:
          “In essence, it is merely a question. Some of our clients own tens of thousands of domains, and we could not possibly know if you possess a domain that would fit this buyer. We cannot read over every single domain in your portfolio merely to ask such a question.”
          It is either one or the other. Please decide which is it.

          Concerning Sedo: I myself have removed 95% of my domains from sedo because of those tactics. Try to focus on criticism on your company.

    • @Brand,

      That was a completely different issue that Adam Dicker had, and he has applauded us in the way we have handled it, and we continue to make sales for him to this very day. If Adam reads this I am sure he will agree with what I am saying.

      @Andrea,

      If I recall we decided to stop doing business with you. Not you with us.

      Thank you.

      Jeffrey M. Gabriel

      • @ Jeffrey,
        You recall incorrectly because we had already removed almost all (all but one, to be precise) our domains from DomainNameSales before you arbitrarily closed our account.
        We have all evidence of that.
        Maybe you should stop lying and manipulating reality.

  • I also forgot to add:

    When a buyer is not interested we do reserve the right to offer that buyer other alternatives from your very own portfolio. I do not see how anyone would be against that.

    Thank you again,

    Jeffrey M. Gabriel

    • ?Looks like we got disconnected ? just let me know if you want me to extend an offer to acquire the .com; alternatively, I am happy to look at derivative names that also would fit your needs??

      This sounds more like trying to sell New gTLDs and not offering other domains from seller’s portfolio.

  • Don’t worry, if they buy they the gtld, not long before they will be back for the .com, we are still seeing it with .co to this day

  • It can go both ways, one of your domains may sell to a lead that came in from another user. If an old lead hasn’t panned out chances are they aren’t buying your name anyway.

  • I had not heard about this feature, so today I logged into my domainnamesales.com account now and saw the new section named “Old Lead Management”, and saw my account had it set for “disabled”, so it is not something they enable by default.

    Keep in mind than when other DNS customers have this enabled, and as a last resort the broker pitches other domains (whether they actually do that or not seems to be a matter of debate – Jeffrey Gabriel says they do not do that), it might lead to a sale of one of your domains. So, I am not really sure of the downside to all of this. If the lead is considered “dead” then why does it matter what they do with it, as long as it might help you get a sale?

    • Hey Eric – I guess it depends on what you consider a “dead” lead. If there is inactivity from a lead after 30 or 60 days is it dead? What if they were waiting to get the budget for your domain but now they are offered an alternative cheaper domain? You could lose a future sale. Better safe than sorry.

    • The problem is that it is not DNS’s choice how to treat “dead” leads.
      I consider dead leads 1+ year old leads. Old is not necessarily dead.
      The fact that I push a lead to DNS doesn’t mean that it is dead.
      I just want them to try and make the sale.

      And there is a difference as to what people consider as a dead lead.
      To me, this doesn’t sound like a dead lead. They asked for an offer and immediately tried to pitch in other domains.

      • It is an opt-in system, so as long as they explain it well ahead of time (when you opt-in) then it should not be a problem. They just need to be more clear in their explanation of exactly what they will and won’t do when they contact the lead. Also, right now they only have a choice of 1 or 2 months for what to consider a “dead lead” but as you said, they should add more choices (like 6 months and 1 year).

  • Eric,

    Good idea. We will expand the age of the leads to something longer.

    Mr. Zournas,

    You are taking everything out of context. That was not the case. You are making it sound like someone assigns a lead to us, then we immediately offer them another domain.

    You need to realize that sales is not an assembly line where the same action over and over gets you the same result. It is easy to say I contradict myself, but it is far from the truth.

    When someone opts into our service our clients trust that we are working in their best interest. If one of our clients does not want us to do something a specific way, then they need to communicate that to us.

    There are many happy customers that use DNS, and trust the way we conduct business. In the month of September alone we will surpass 2M in sales for our clients. I am proud of our sales team for hitting those numbers, and we are certainly grateful for the opportunities our clients gave us.

    Jeffrey M. Gabriel

    • No, I am not.
      You are just not replying to anything or you reply vaguely.
      I did not get a single answer to what I asked you.
      Just reply to the facts for once.

      This always happens with DNS. I have support tickets that are open for months now and not a single reply. And all my suggestions are ignored so I stopped doing them.

      You first need to communicate what you are doing so we know what to ask you not to do and not learn about it by accident.

      Are you or are you not offering other people’s domains or nameadmin domains to leads that come from individual domains?

      Stop posting irrelevant things and reply.

      • Mr. Zournas,

        That is alarming to hear. I checked all of your customer service requests, they have been responded to. Your suggestions have also been responded to. Perhaps you should make a customer service request with your email provider?

        Please read the threads again, and the other times you asked me the same question on other blogs all of your answers are there.

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